Lockdown stage 4

Lockdown stage 4

Well, South Africa has been on a pretty severe lockdown since March 27th.  The original lockdown was extended by two weeks, the government then announced the easing of restrictions and outlined what would be allowed under 5 stages. Stage 5 is the most stringent which is what we were under initially for 6 weeks. We were only allowed to leave our homes for 3 reasons: 1) buy groceries, 2) seek medical care, or 3) collect social grants. During this time no sales of cigarettes or alcohol were permitted. The military and police were deployed to enforce the rules. While these rules were frustratingly harsh, they kept people from getting sick, and ultimately that is what matters.

Lockdown Stage 4 which we have been under since May 1st permits some restaurants to offer delivery service and shops are allowed to sell winter clothes. We are required to wear a mask when out in public. We are now allowed to exercise (run, walk, cycle) within a 5K radius from our home between 0600 and 0900.  The first day of the relaxed restrictions was a bit of a mess with people flooding the waterfront area and not wearing masks. So much so in fact that a government minister issued a statement essentially stating that it was really easy to go back to stage 5 if people couldn’t follow the rules.  The following day there were additional police in the area to ensure compliance. 

In addition to the restrictions the government has announced several initiatives aimed at helping individuals and small businesses survive this pandemic. While one could argue that it’s not enough it is certainly more than other nations are doing and more coordinated.  

What’s next?

At some point, the government will declare we can now move to stage 3. This will allow for the sales of alcohol, tobacco, and other non-essential items.  Stage 2 will allow for the resumption of domestic flights. The kicker is that the levels set at a national level. Provincial or even metro level may differ. Since Cape Town has seen a spike in cases recently, I expect we may be under stricter restrictions than less populated or rural areas. For more details on what is allowed at each level click here. At this point, we don’t know when international flights will resume. I’m not expecting anything until late 2020 or early 2021.

Ok, but how are you?

On a personal level we are doing fine.  We are able to get groceries delivered and have been improving our culinary skills. We’ve been having video calls with friends and family both locally and abroad, so we have a sense of connection.  We were on one such call with friends when someone sent me this article… Talk about a harsh reality check.  So, after I checked my privilege, I can honestly say that we are pretty lucky. 

Stay safe and stay healthy

Covid-19 update #2

Covid-19 update #2

The last few weeks have been a bit hectic and chaotic for us.  We were initially leaning towards heading back to the states after several conversations with our families in the US and powers that be at P’s employer.  The more we thought about it the more sense it made to stay in SA.  By traveling we would be going through 3 airports, two airplanes, and need to drive through IL to northern WI. If we ended up needing to quarantine in a hotel for 14 days, there was an additional risk of exposure.  So, in the end, we decided to stay. Which was the right move because while we would have been able to fly out on March 28th, the President of SA announced a near-total shut down of the country beginning on the 27th.  This ultimately meant no passenger flights would be leaving. 

The lockdown means no restaurants, bars, or coffee shops are open.  You are allowed to leave your home to go to the grocery store, the pharmacy, or the doctor. You can’t go for a jog or walk your dog. All alcohol and cigarette sales have been suspended. Basically, the only things you can buy at the moment are food, medicine, and gasoline.  The police and Army have been deployed to maintain checkpoints and patrol to ensure compliance. The SA government is taking this VERY seriously. Which given the amount of vulnerable people living in SA I think this is the correct response. I read a report last night that Khayelitsha became the first township to have a confirmed case. Sadly, some of the folks in the townships weren’t complying with the lockdown rules and now the entire township is at a major risk.  This is heartbreaking because the lockdown order was meant to protect these very people.

As for our personal safety; we are a short drive to a smaller grocery store. When we need to venture out that is where we will likely go to restock. We also have the option of using grocery delivery services. We are trying one out that specializes in fresh meat.  (I’m really craving a steak).  Our main concern at this point is social unrest or rioting. I expect that any riots or protests that occur will start in the townships and work their way to the city center (or Central Business District) before they get to us. We are away from the city center and at the top of a very steep hill.  That being said the US embassy is sending us twice daily emails on the status of evacuations and P’s employer is keeping an eye on the situation as well.  If the situation turns, we have a couple of contingency plans in place to remain safe (I guess all that post-apocalyptic fiction I read a while ago has been useful).

Stay safe and healthy friends-

Bruler Travels.

Covid-19 in SA

Covid-19 in SA

Quick update

At this point, South Africa has less than 70 confirmed cases of Covid-19, so it’s a week or so behind the US, which is a week or so behind Europe. But the government has announced some pretty severe travel restrictions, so that should help slow the spread. There are still some things we are trying to get confirmation on (cancelation of visas, etc).   On the bright side of things, South Africa seems to be always prepared for some sort of crisis.  Most recently it’s been electricity shortages, water shortages, etc. South Africa has been able to somehow navigate those, so I’m hopeful the nation will be able to navigate Covid-19 as well. 

My main concern at this point is all the folks living in the townships/informal settlements.  They already have little to no sanitation, social distancing is not an option for them due to proximity, and access to healthcare is limited at best. In all likelihood, once the virus gets in there a lot of people will become sick and likely die. 

P has been ordered to work from home for the next few weeks. We are stockpiling food so that we won’t have to go out when things get bad. But this does make me miss our American sized fridge and stocked pantry. We have made plans to combine resources and shelter in place with friends if it gets really bad.  And in the event all-out anarchy happens, P’s employer will evacuate us.   So, we are very much taking a plan for the worst, hope for the best approach to this.  I guess reading “The Stand” and watching “The Walking Dead” did teach me a few things. 

I’m more concerned for our friends and family in The States at this point. Thankfully most folks are taking this seriously and doing all they can to prepare.  At this point none of my family and friends have been diagnosed with the virus that I know of, so that’s a relief.

Please check in on your loved ones to ensure they are ok. 

I’m dreaming of a white Christmas

Well, I guess it’s more appropriate to say I was dreaming of a white Christmas. So we headed back to The States for the holidays. Normally we would connect through Europe or the middle east, but United Airlines decided to start a seasonal flight between Newark, NJ, and Cape Town. We decided to give them a try, and wow what a letdown. The actual flight and food were fine, but EVERY SINGLE MEMBER of the cabin crew must have been having a bad day. Needless to say, we probably won’t be flying United for awhile.

So for the actual trip, we left Cape Town on the 21st of December AKA the longest day of the year, and arrived in Newark on the shortest day of the year… Aren’t hemispheres fun?? This made for some super fun Jet lag experiences as I was regularly waking up anywhere between 2 and 3 am daily… which also meant I was dead tired by 7 pm.

This gentleman recently turned 14

But all was not lost, we were able to enjoy time with family and friends ( as always there is never enough time to see everyone you want to or even planned to see (Sorry Marta!)) and most importantly we were able to hang out with our dog Senna. It was definitely a bitter-sweet trip because he’s slowing down and his arthritis is getting worse. But he was happy to see us, and we spoiled him with some Costco rotisserie chicken and got in some cuddles.

The weather seemed to mostly corporate with our plans, and we were happy that the general Wisconsin area experienced a relative heat wave, this was most welcome as we’ve gotten used to the mild temps in Cape Town. Don’t get me wrong, we were still cold, but we didn’t feel like we were going to die. We were able to get in some traditions: Friday night fish fry, New years day brunch, family game night, and an Old Fashioned (made the correct way). We even tried our hands at snowshoeing… Wow, it’s more like a workout than a normal walk in the woods.

Leaving as everyone knows is always hard, but we know that we have an amazing tribe of folks that will be excited to see us next time we are back. In spite of how great the trip was I was happy to get back to Cape Town, in many ways (despite all it’s flaws) it’s become home.

Until Next time!